Can you tell me about the roots of Tahitian lime trees for transplanting

In poor soil at the moment and has not grown much in two years. Have chosen full sun aspect in same garden bed as roses and other plants . not too heavily occupied.

yates

12 October 2011 02:36 AM

Dear Lesley,

If you need to transplant your lime tree, it would be wise to do it now before the weather warms up. Have the area where you are going transplant it to ready by digging the hole twice the size of the rootball you have taken. Pick a spot that is in full sun and protected from strong winds. Incorporate some well rotted organic matter into the soil and make sure the spot is free draining. To lessen the stress on your lime tree when tranplanting, you can spray the tree with a Yates product called Yates Waterwise DroughtShield. This product will improve the tree's survival and recovery after transplanting by reducing water loss by up to 50%. Before applying the product, water the plant well and then spray with the Yates Waterwise DroughtShield several hours before transplanting. When taking the lime tree out of the ground, take as large a root ball as is possible. Lift the root ball with soil attached onto a sheet of plastic and carry it to its new location in your garden. Place the tree into the hole and backfill with the existing soil. Firm it down around the root system and water in well with a seaweed solution. Yates have just released a new product called Yates Dynamic Lifter Liquid Concentrate. It's a organically certified fertiliser, which contains seaweed, blood&bone and fish meal to help developing new roots and restoring healthy growth. Keep your tree watered on a regular basis and I am sure with the attention you are going to give it, it will settle in and give you many limes in the years ahead.

Topics: Fruit and Citrus Issues: Plants