How to grow carrots in a garden

  1. Choose a sunny spot in the garden, loosen the soil with a garden fork and dig in Yates Dynamic Lifter Soil Improver & Plant Fertiliser. Ensure you dig around the soil really well and break up any hard pieces - carrots love soft soil, which doesn’t have any hard lumps or stones in it, otherwise the carrots might grow into some weird shapes! 
  2. Sow seeds around 6mm deep and 50mm apart. Cover, firm down and moisten. 
  3. Water regularly to keep soil moist and thin seedlings after 4 weeks – gently pull out weak seedlings, leaving the healthiest in place. 
  4. Feed weekly with Yates Thrive Vegie & Herb Liquid Plant Food.
  5. Sow successive crops at 4-5 weekly intervals.

     


How to grow carrots in a pot

Not all carrots will be happy in pots, so look for baby and small golf ball varieties. 

  1. Choose troughs or containers that are at least 300mm deep and 400-600mm wide and position in a sunny spot. 
  2. Fill with Yates Potting Mix with Dynamic Lifter. Sow seed around 6mm deep and 50mm apart.  Cover, firm down and moisten.
  3. Water regularly to keep soil moist and thin seedlings after 4 weeks – gently pull out weak seedlings, leaving the healthiest in place. 
  4. Feed weekly with Yates Thrive Vegie & Herb Liquid Plant Food.
  5. Sow successive crops at 4-5 weekly intervals.

Yates varieties


Growing tips

  • Carrot seeds only need to be sown 6mm deep, so don’t be tempted to plant them too deeply otherwise they won’t be able to grow.

  • A fun thing to do with home grown carrots is to leave some of the green stems on the top of the carrot to use as ‘carrot handles’ – it gives you something to hold on to as you nibble them! The trick to ‘straight’ carrots is to keep the soil moist, but not wet, otherwise the carrots will rot. 


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