how-to-grow-bay-tree-6

The world is divided when it comes to coriander – people either love it or hate it! If you love it, why not grow it?  Also known as cilantro or Chinese parsley, this glorious herb can be used in many Asian dishes, paired with fish, soups, salads and even ground into pesto. The best bit? You can use the whole plant –leaves, stems, roots and seeds, too.


How to grow coriander in a garden

  1. Choose a spot in your garden that sits mostly in full sun (when growing in winter) or part shade (when growing in summer).  
  2. Enrich soil with Yates Dynamic Lifter Soil Improver & Plant Fertiliser.  Sow seeds 6mm deep and 20cm apart. Water in well 
  3. Feed seedlings weekly with Yates Thrive Vegie & Herb Liquid Plant Food and mulch with an organic mulch, such as sugar cane or pea straw. 
  4. Water regularly. Don’t let the plants dry out as the stress may cause them to bolt (set seed), which will make the leaves tough and almost tasteless. 
  5. Snip leaves off as you please and this will encourage more to grow back.

     
how-to-grow-coriander_1551160333110
how-to-grow-coriander_1551160330749

 

How to grow coriander in a pot

  1. Choose a pot that’s at least 200mm wide and deep and position a sunny or partly shaded spot.
  2. Fill pot with quality potting mix, such as Yates Potting Mix with Dynamic Lifter. Sow seeds and water in well. 
  3. Feed seedlings weekly with Yates Thrive Vegie & Herb Liquid Plant Food 
  4. Water regularly. Don’t let the plants dry out as the stress may cause them to bolt (set seed), which will make the leaves tough and almost tasteless. 
  5. Snip leaves off as you please and this will encourage more to grow back.

Growing tips

  • Coriander is renowned for being difficult to grow. This reputation comes mostly from its bad habit of quickly rushing to flower and set seed (bolting). Yates Coriander is a ‘slow-bolt’ variety that’s less likely to do this, but even the best of corianders is unreliable when it’s very hot, very cold or when the plants experience sudden changes in their growing conditions.

  • Probably the easiest way to maintain a good supply of fresh coriander is to plant seeds every few weeks from September right though until the end of autumn. Take a break over winter and begin sowing again in early spring. That way, if your coriander does go to seed, you’ll have more fresh plants on the way.

  • Check the soil moisture regularly if growing in a pot, especially if growing in a terracotta pot – this dries out faster than other materials. Insert your index finger into the soil to your first knuckle – if it’s moist, leave watering for a few days. If soil is not kept moderately moist at all times, coriander may bolt to seed resulting in a loss of productive leafy growth.  

 



Project guides & articles

Turmeric

The well known main ingredient of Indian curry, the bright yellow colour of the Turmeric tuber can be also used fresh in salads.

Bay Tree

Bay Trees are versatile plants and easy to maintain. Being a large growing foliage plant it's perfect as a screen tree or feature tree.

Basil

Basil is a deliciously fragrant, quick growing herb that pairs perfectly with tomatoes, garlic and lemon.

Borage

Borage is grown for its pretty flowers. The flowers are edible and are used in salads and cake dressings and bees love to forage on them!


Recommended products