Can I keep a dormant Frangipani in a darkened garage over winter in Melbourne?

My frangipani's always get tip rot in Melbourne over winter. I keep them under cover out of the rain, however, they are still exposed to our very cold winters. I was wondering if when they are dormant can I keep them in the garage to afford them more protection from the cold (my wife will not let me bring them into the house) or will it be too dark for too long for them? Thanks

yates

12 January 2016 01:10 AM

Hello Sam,

Frangipani growers around the world (particularly in colder climates) have successfully used this method (in a basement or garage that insulates from outdoor temperature extremes) to safely over-winter their potted specimens. Whilst exact requirements for different locations and respective conditions may vary, here are a few pointers to minimise your chances of any issues cropping up: - Keep the plants indoors for the minimum amount of time required to safely avoid the weather that is contributing to your tip rot issues. In Melbourne this may be less than two months, but as we know it is renowned for unpredictable weather, so best to keep an eye on longer term weather forecasts. - Remove any remaining mature or semi-mature leaves before moving the plants indoors. The plants shouldn't be actively growing when moved into storage. - Maximise natural airflow as much as possible. - Water applied should be minimal, if applied at all. They will probably need to be slightly moist on entering storage, but avoid watering as much as possible while in storage, up to the point that the soil begins to dry out completely. If the soil does dry out to the point of becoming water-repellent, you can apply some Yates Waterwise Soil Wetter to rehabilitate the soil when the new growing season begins. Some Yates Dynamic Lifter should also give the plants and soil a healthy boost to start the new season. We wish you all the very best in over-wintering your frangipanis. Kind regards, Matt Yates Consumer Advice Horticulturalist

Topics: Flowers and Ornamentals Issues: Plants