Description

Features

  • Contains chicken manure, seaweed, blood & bone, fish meal, fulvates and potassium.
  • Organically certified.
  • Dual acting formula feeds both through leaves and roots for fast visible results.
  • Easy to apply liquid concentrate format.
  • Helps improve soil by allowing for better water and nutrient holding.
  • Feeds worms and micro-organisms to help build healthier soil.
  • Assists drainage and aeration for better root growth.
  • Good source of slow release organic nutrients Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P), Potassium (K).
  • Approved for the organic gardener.
  • Safe for all plants and can be used all year round.
  • Safe for native plants.
  • The non spill cap allows for easy non mess dosing.

Yates Dynamic Lifter Liquid Concentrate is a natural fertiliser to gently feed all garden plants and improve soil all year round.

Specifications

Size

  • 500mL

  • 1L

  • 2L hose-on

Ingredients

  • NPK: 2.6: 0.4: 1.6 (500ml & 1L)
  • NPK: 1.1: .15: .7 (2L hose-on)

How to use

Directions for use

Shake bottle well. Always dilute with water before use. 1 capful = approximately 40ml. Planting / Transplanting 20-40ml. Use weekly after planting until established. New lawns 40ml. Use weekly after planting or germination until established. All plants in pots & garden beds 40-80ml. Use every 1-3 weeks all year round. Large shrubs & trees, lawns 80-160ml. Use every 1-3 weeks all year round. Delicate plants 20ml. Use in early spring and repeat every 2-3 weeks.  

NOT TO BE USED FOR ANY PURPOSE OR IN ANY MANNER CONTRARY TO THIS LABEL UNLESS AUTHORISED

Precautions

  • Do not apply if maximum temperature exceeds 30 degrees or plants are suffering from moisture stress. 
  • Do not apply where ruminants or herbivores are to be grazed.

Videos

Join Kim Syrus - ‘The Garden Gurus’ TV Presenter and Qualified Horticulturist - as he talks about how to improve your garden’s soil using Yates Dynamic Lifter.

 


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