Can I transplant a mature sasanqua hedge in late March?

can you please advise how successful I would be in transplanting a mature Sasanqua hedge in late March and any tips would be appreciated?

yates

07 February 2014 08:37 PM

Hi Jenny,

The way the weather is these days, it can still be hot in late March which is not ideal for transplanting. The camellia would be carrying lots of flower buds which would need to be remove if you were to transplant the bush. If there is no alternative but to transplant, you will need to give your camellia a fighting chance by taking steps to lessen the impact on the tree. To start with, you will need to prune back the foliage to a reasonable height. Once that is done, you can apply a Yates product called Yates Waterwise DroughtShield. This product forms a protective thin polymer film on the leaf reducing transpiration, reducing wilting and transplant shock. You will need to ensure that both the upper and lower leaf surfaces are sprayed. Prepare the soil in the new location making the hole deep and wide enough to accommodate the root ball that you are going to take. When removing the camellia take as big a root ball as you possibly can and once out of the ground trim the roots of the plant so they are nice and clean. Place the plant on a big sheet of plastic and carry it carefully to its new location. Place the camellia into the prepared hole and backfill firmly around the rootball. Keep packing in the soil until the camellia is standing firmly in the ground. You may need to place three stakes in around the camellia and tie securely with some webbing to give it the support it needs. Water in well with a seaweed solution or use Yates Uplift Organic Plant Starter & Root Booster to help the new roots to establish and to help the plant to recover. Give another application 2 weeks later and continue to do so until the plant recovers. Hopefully we will have a mild autumn and your camellia will transplant beautifully and continue to grow happily in its new location. The best of luck.

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