loquats

Cumquats are known for their very tart citrus flavour and are most commonly used in jams, marmaldes and preserves. Many people also enjoy eating cumquats whole, including the fragrant skin, which can be sweeter than the flesh itself. There are several different varieties of cumquats, also called kumquats, including oval fruited ‘Nagami’ and round ‘Marumi’. There’s also a cumquat with both variegated leaves and fruit. Cumquats can also be very decorative trees, with their white fragrant flowers and brightly coloured fruit covering the trees from winter to early spring. Cumquats are often grown purely as ornamental trees, however marmalade makers will appreciate a basket of fruit!


How to grow cumquats in a garden

  1. Choose a sunny spot with well drained soil. Enrich the soil with Yates Dynamic Lifter Soil Improver & Plant Fertiliser. If the soil is clay based, add gypsum and fork in well. 
  2. Dig the planting hole twice as wide and to the same depth as the root-ball. Remove the shrub from the container, gently tease the roots and cut away any circled or tangled roots.
  3. Position in hole and backfill with soil, gently firming down. Form a raised or doughnut shaped ring of soil around the outer edge of the plant's root zone. This helps keep water where it's needed.  Always water in well after planting to settle the soil around the roots and keep the soil moist for several weeks while the new plant establishes.
  4. Mulch around the base with organic mulch like bark chips, sugarcane or pea straw, keeping it away from the trunk.
  5. Water deeply, once or twice a week, depending on weather conditions.
  6. Apply Yates Dynamic Lifter Soil Improver & Plant Fertiliser yearly – once in spring, summer and autumn. When in flower, feed weekly with Yates Thrive Citrus & Fruit Plant Food to help promote more flowering and fruiting.



How to grow cumquats in a pot

  1. When growing a cumquat in a container, choose a well drained pot that’s at least 40 cm in diameter (a Yates Tuscan pot is ideal) and use a good quality potting mix like Yates® Premium Potting Mix.
  2. Remove the shrub from the container, gently tease the roots and cut away any circled or tangled roots.
  3. Position in hole and backfill with potting mix, gently firming down. Water in well.
  4. Mulch around the base with organic mulch like bark chips, sugarcane or pea straw, keeping it away from the trunk.
  5. Water deeply, once or twice a week, depending on weather conditions.
  6. Apply Yates Dynamic Lifter Soil Improver & Plant Fertiliser yearly – once in spring, summer and autumn. When in flower, feed weekly with Yates Thrive Citrus & Fruit Plant Food to help promote more flowering and fruiting.

Growing tips

  • Cumquats can grow up to 5 m tall or around 2.5 m for dwarf grafted trees, which are ideal for growing in smaller spaces and also pots. They’re hardy trees and will grow well in cool climates as well as warm areas. They need a spot with well-drained soil that receives at least 6 hours of sunshine a day.
  • Early to mid autumn is an ideal time to plant a new cumquat tree. 
  • Keep the new tree well watered, particularly during its first summer. Cumquats are heavy feeders and require lots of nutrients to support all the foliage, flowers and developing fruit. While trees are flowering, growing new foliage or carrying fruit, feed every 8 weeks with Yates Thrive® Natural Citrus & Fruit  Organic Based Pelletised Plant Food. It contains a special combination of more than 50% natural ingredients, boosted with fast acting fertilisers. It encourages healthy green leaf growth and is high in flower and fruit promoting potassium.

 


Project guides & articles

Caring for citrus

Protect your citrus trees from weed, mulch, pests and rots. Fertilise and nurture it for it to bear sumptuous fruits.

Get composting!

Food scraps, fallen leaves and small tree clippings are wonderful sources of potential organic matter for your garden.


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