persimmons

Considered to be the ‘fruit of the gods’, permissimon (also known as the Japanese persimmon) is a superb tree to grow in your garden. The flavour alone should be enough to entice you, but if you’re still not convinced, the tree is still well-worth growing for its fabulous autumn colours. The leaves turn glorious shades of red, orange and gold before dropping in autumn, often leaving the fruit hanging decoratively on the bare branches.

There are two types – astringent and non-astringent – which have the same growing conditions, but different flavours. 


How to grow persimmons in a garden

  1. Choose a sunny spot that’s protected from strong winds. Enrich the soil with Yates Dynamic Lifter Soil Improver & Plant Fertiliser. If the soil is alkaline, add Yates Soil Acidifer Liquid Sulfur.
  2. Dig the planting hole twice as wide and to the same depth as the root-ball. Remove the shrub from the container, gently tease the roots and cut away any circled or tangled roots.
  3. Position in hole and backfill with soil, gently firming down. Form a raised or doughnut shaped ring of soil around the outer edge of the plant's root zone. This helps keep water where it's needed.  Always water in well after planting to settle the soil around the roots and keep the soil moist for several weeks while the new plant establishes.
  4. Mulch around the base with organic mulch like bark chips, sugarcane or pea straw, keeping it away from the trunk.
  5. Water deeply, once or twice a week, depending on weather conditions.
  6. Feed your tree once in early spring and mid-summer. When flowering and fruiting, feed weekly with Yates Thrive Citrus Liquid Plant Food to help promote fruit production. 

     
persimmons

 

How to grow in a pot

Persimmons can grow into medium to large sized trees, but can be contained if grown in large pots. 

  1. Choose a pot at least 600mm wide. Position in full sun and fill with quality potting mix, such as Yates Potting Mix with Dynamic Lifter
  2. Remove the shrub from the container, gently tease the roots and cut away any circled or tangled roots.
  3. Position in hole and backfill with potting mix, gently firming down. Water in well.
  4. Mulch with an organic mulch, such as bark chips, sugar cane or pea straw ensuring to keep it away from the trunk.
  5. Water deeply, once or twice a week, depending on weather conditions.
  6. Feed your tree once in early spring and mid-summer. When flowering and fruiting, feed weekly with Yates Thrive Citrus Liquid Plant Food to help promote fruit production. 

Growing tips

  • Traditional persimmon varieties like ‘Dai Dai Maru’, ‘Hachiyu’ and ‘20th Century’ are  astringent types, which means they can only be eaten when they’re ripe and very soft – we don’t recommend trying when they’re not ready! Newer non-astringent varieties like ’Fuyu’, ‘Izu’ and ‘Ichikikei Jiro’ and can be eaten while the fruit is still firm.

  • Astringent varities are mostly self-fertile, so you will only need one tree for fruit set. With non-astringent varieties, having two trees will improve fruit set. 
  • Persimmon trees have a reputation for making very slow growth in the early stages, but a regular feeding throughout the year will encourage the better plant and root growth. 

  • In heavy clay soils, it’s best to put extra effort into soil preparation. To check if your soil needs work, dig a hole and pour a bucket of water into the hole – if it takes more than 30 minutes to disappear, then you will need to work your soil. Consider raising the level of the bed as much as possible, dig in gypsum and plenty of Yates Dynamic Lifter Soil Improver & Plant Fertiliser.Persimmon plants often become available for sale with the other deciduous fruit trees in late autumn or early winter. You can also start looking for them in early autumn, so you have a better idea of the fiery autumn colours the tree will display.

  • Persimmons don’t need much pruning. Once the framework is established, it can usually be left alone.

  • Persimmons may take several years to bear fruit, but be patient - they'll be with you for a long time! 

  • Avoid pulling the fruit from the tree, you may risk removing the calyx and spoiling the fruit. Instead, snip the fruit gently from the tree with a pair of pruning shears.

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