What plant would you recommend to plant next to a west facing wall

My cat passed away about five weeks ago. We have him buried on the edge of our lawn and we want to plant a suitable plant here to remember him by - he was a much loved family pet of 17 years. He is buried about a metre away from a wall that is very dark in colour and will get the full bang of the sun in summer as it faces west. That said, my neighbour's roof gutter is also nearby so that it has recently had quite a lot of rain (this winter) and as such the ground is quite wet at the moment. I live in Frenchs Forest - Sydney. Any plant suggestions would be appreciated - ideally the plant will look good year round

yates

10 July 2013 08:19 AM

Hi David,

I am so sorry to hear about the death of your beloved pet. They do become so much a part of the family that you really miss them when they go. I am sure he had a wonderful life and enjoyed every day. There are so many beautiful plants you could use to remember him by. Because it is west facing, you will need a plant that will be able to withstand the hot summer sun. With regard to the soil in that spot, no matter what plant you put in, good drainage is always an important factor. Preparing the soil with some compost/organic matter before planting will also help the plant to do well. I am not sure if you are a fan of roses, but there are some beautiful, perfumed roses that would be nice to have in that spot. You could also pick the blooms and have them inside in a vase which I am sure you would enjoy. There are some lovely native plants such as small growing grevilleas that tend to flower most of the year and would do well in that hot spot. Tibouchina is another showy plant that would give you lots of colour in late summer/autumn and when flowering would remind you of your precious pet. You might like to pop down to your local nursery who will be stocking up for spring at the moment. I am sure they will have a good supply of plants that you would enjoy planting. Take care.

Topics: Flowers and Ornamentals Issues: Plants